The quiet struggle: Leaving a job I love to care for my family and mental health

February 24, 2021

Mentalhealth

The struggle to maintain mental health is a universal experience in the American workplace. Before the pandemic, one in four American workers had been diagnosed with depression and one in three reported having experienced some form of depression. This is even more relevant in this current crisis.

The Black workforce heroes who shaped today’s world of work

February 1, 2021

Heroes

The history of work in America is a long and complex one. From the industrial revolution onward, work has shaped every aspect of our lives, including housing, education, economic mobility and food security. A significant, but often overlooked, population in this history are the Black workforce activists.

Supporting women and mothers in the workplace

January 27, 2021

Working At Home Mom

By Shaina Gross, Director of Programs; Research by Daniel Enemark, Ph.D., Senior Economist @danielenemark Tweet this article U.S. women lost 156,000 jobs last month, while men gained 16,000.  When I first read this startling statistic from CNN on my social media feed, my hopeful heart said that can’t be true. Which was immediately followed by

The nexus of systemic racism, criminal justice and economic opportunity

December 3, 2020

Side View Of African American Prisoner Reading Book

The evidence of racial bias in our criminal justice system is overwhelming. But it is critical that we reflect more on the interrelation of racism in our justice system and the impacts that reverberate out to our economy and workforce that have lasting consequences for our society.

Discarding ageism to harness the experience of older workers

November 17, 2020

Portrait Of Auto Mechanic Senior Man With Face Mask At Auto Repair Shop

Many Americans are working well past the traditional retirement age of 65, into their 70s and 80s. Over the coming decade, workers 55 years and older will be the fastest-growing segment of the workforce, gifting our communities with the opportunity to learn and grow from their years of professional experience.

San Diego’s veterans answered the call to serve; our systems must do the same

November 10, 2020

Attractive Mid Adult Female Army Vet Stands In Sunlit Window

San Diego is home to the largest metropolitan veteran workforce anywhere in the country. Veteran unemployment isn’t simply an issue for another community to solve; San Diego sits at the heart of the problem.

New Americans make San Diego’s economy work—now let’s make it work for them

October 21, 2020

Latina Nurse In Scrubs Looking Down

To address inequity, we must be willing to ask hard questions, make unpopular decisions and stand for what is right. Diversity is one of San Diego’s greatest strengths, yet people of color face dramatic inequities in our local education, employment, healthcare, banking and justice systems. Immigrants and English learners—over a quarter of San Diegans—face inequities tied to legal status, language fluency, skin color and religion. If our economy is to thrive, this cannot stand.

Race, Equity & Worker Power in San Diego County

October 14, 2020

Donna Deberry screenshot during conversation

This conversation on race, equity and worker power in San Diego County covers topics like what keeps policymakers from addressing racism and equality, what justice and equity look like in a modern police force, the role of business as an engine for change, education as a tool for economic mobility, worker power through organized labor, action steps you can take and so much more.

What’s next? Action planning on the road to racial justice

September 29, 2020

cardboard sign that says

As the national dialogue continues to fuel the spotlight on racial equity you may, like me, be finding yourself in discussions of race hearing: “We donated to NAACP but what more can we do?” “I believe in equity. I believe in change. What do I do next?” “I’m just one person, how could I have an impact on systemic racism?”

San Diego’s Racial Equity Gap: How We Got Here

September 16, 2020

City of San Diego redlining map

The history of systemic racism in America—and San Diego in particular—has created a regional economy in which people of color do not have access to the same opportunities as white San Diegans. As a result, even controlling for age, gender and education, Black San Diegans make $10,500 less than their white peers.

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