Through income share agreements, the San Diego Workforce Partnership provides access to high-quality training programs and career-readiness and placement services that help you start a career in a high-demand technology jobs.

In exchange, you agree to pay a fixed percentage of your income for a fixed period of time. Unlike with a student loan, you only make ISA payments when you’re employed and earning more than the minimum income threshold of $40,000. 

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Why income share agreements (ISAs)? 

ISAs allow us to offer education, coaching and support to those who otherwise could not afford it. Our goal is to create a sustainable program that can offer thousands of San Diegans the chance to launch a new career and secure a better future for themselves and their families. 

Who should apply for the Workforce ISA Fund?  

The program is currently tailored to individuals interested in a career in technology. Future cohorts will offer ISAs in other fields of study. ISAs are not for everyone. We encourage all applicants to weigh the features and benefits of ISAs against other financing options available to them. UC San Diego Extension outlines several other options here

What are the payment requirements?  

Once you leave the program, you’ll be responsible for paying back a percentage of your income, which varies depending on what program you choose. These payments will not be required until you earn $40,000 a year or more.

What percentage of income would I be required to pay back?  

Depending on your course of study, your income share will be between six and eight percent of your income. 

What is the payment cap for the ISA?  

The Workforce ISA Fund payment cap is $11,700, or 1.8x the cost of the program. This means that if you were to graduate from UC San Diego Extension and get a high-paying job, you may make fewer payments than the number in your ISA contract.

How do monthly payments work?  

Monthly payments are calculated by multiplying your earned monthly income and your required income share. You will receive a monthly bill for this amount and you can make your payments online through our servicing platform. 

Following the completion of the program, when does the payment plan start?  

After leaving the program, there is a three–month grace period before you’re required to begin making payments if you are earning an annual salary over $40,000.   

Can I pay off my ISA early?  

Yes. You can complete your obligation at any time by paying the payment cap.

Am I guaranteed a job at the end of the program? 

No. The Workforce Partnership can’t guarantee you a job, but we’ll do everything we can to help you get one. We have an established track record of serving thousands of San Diegans every year and a dedicated team that will help you achieve your career goals after graduation. 

What other options are available to pay for a UC San Diego Extension certificate?  

Please review these options on UC San Diego Extension’s website. 

What if I’m interested in gaining similar skills, but I do not want to sign up for an ISA?  

There are many other technology education options for people interested in these careers. The UC San Diego Extension courses chosen are available to anyone, independent of this program.

San Diego’s community colleges also offer classes in these subject areas that may be lower cost, or even free, depending on your financial situation. As part of our application process, the Workforce Partnership will help you evaluate other potential educational and financial options to make sure an ISA is the right fit. 

The Workforce Partnership partners with a financial institution that specializes in issuing & managing income share agreements. After you have graduated or exited the program, payments will be made to this partner through an online portal much like paying a utility bill. These payments will go back into our ISA Fund and enable us to continue to offer this program to more students in the coming years.

When you sign an ISA contract with the Workforce Partnership, you can expect the timeline of your contract to look something like this:

15526 Wp Isapathway Desktop B.03b

Education – You attend UC San Diego Extension and complete your chosen certificate, which takes 9–18 months. No payments are due during your time in the program even if you secure a high paying job.

Graduation – You have a 3-month grace period after your graduate or leave the program before you need to start making payments. No payments are due during the grace period even if you secure a high-paying job during your studies.

Payment period – 3 months after graduation or exiting the program, you begin to make payments IF you earn more than $40,000 a year. If not, you submit documentation to our financing partners on a quarterly basis to confirm your earnings are below this threshold.

Contract expires – At some point, your obligation to your ISA will end. This may occur when you have hit the payment cap, made the required number of payments OR the contract payment window has expired. Once you have reached one of these three milestones, your contract has expired and your obligation to pay back the fund has ended.

Income share agreements (ISAs) are a financial tool, which can feel complicated. But once you get to know some of the key terms and features associated with them you’ll see they are a useful and straightforward way to pay for education. Here are five important components of a Workforce Partnership ISA. 

Income share:  

This is the fixed percentage of your monthly income that you pay back after you’ve left the program and are earning more than $40,000 annually ($3333.33/month). 

Please remember that your ISA is tied to the monthly figure of $3333.33/month. If you were to take a contract position that paid you $30,000 over 6 months ($5,000/month), you would still be required to make payments should you be in your payment period.

Required payments:  

This is the maximum number of months that you’ll make payments for. After you’ve made the number of monthly required payments described in your ISA contract—between 36 and 60 monthly payments depending on your certificate program—your obligation is complete, no matter how much you ultimately paid. 

Income threshold & payment pause:  

You’re only obligated to make payments when you’re making more than the income threshold, which is $40,000. When you’re making less than $40,000 your payments are paused. You’ll resume payments when you are earning above the minimum income threshold. 

Payment cap:  

If you land a great job soon after you graduate, you might reach the payment cap, which is the maximum amount (in dollar terms) you can pay under your ISA obligation. If you do, your obligation to the ISA has been fulfilled.

Payment window:

If your payments pause because you’re below the income threshold, you will make up those payments once you start earning above the threshold again. This can extend the period of time over which you make your required number of payments. The payment window is the maximum length of time over which you can make payments. At the end of the payment window your obligation is over, provided your account is in good standing, regardless of how many payments you’ve made.

Income share agreements are a student loan alternative. If you’re considering a Workforce ISA as a way to pay for your education, consider some of the following differences:

Your payments for an income share agreement are tied to your success

When you sign up for a student loan, you agree to the payment you are going to make on a monthly basis. If your income increases, decreases or even if you lose your job, a student loan payment still needs to be made. ISA’s are different because your payment is based on a percentage of your salary if you are making more than $40,000 a year. If you make more money, your payment increases; if you make less, your payment decreases or pauses.

Student loans allow you to end your obligations quickly

One area that student loans and ISAs differ in is that loans vary based upon your payment schedule. Loans enable you to pay off your obligation faster and pay less. The obligation can also grow far beyond the original principle if you default on payments because you are unable to pay. ISAs are different in that you cannot reduce your payment by paying off your obligation more quickly.

Income share agreements protect those who don’t succeed   

Unlike a student loan, ISAs are designed so that you only make payments when your income allows you to. In our program, if your earnings drop below the $40,000 threshold, you do not need to continue to make payments. ISAs also have a fixed timeline that eventually expires no matter how much you’ve paid. This means students who go through our program who don’t earn over $40,000 a year never have to pay the program back.

Because income share agreements are tied to the salary students make after graduating, all of our Workforce ISA fund contracts are slightly different. The terms that we have set for each class have been calculated to ensure that each class is eventually able to break even and sustain itself. Below are sample contracts for all of the programs the ISA Fund currently offers.

Sample contracts:

Why income share agreements (ISAs)? 

ISAs allow us to offer education, coaching and support to those who otherwise could not afford it. Our goal is to create a sustainable program that can offer thousands of San Diegans the chance to launch a new career and secure a better future for themselves and their families. 

Who should apply for the Workforce ISA Fund?  

The program is currently tailored to individuals interested in a career in technology. Future cohorts will offer ISAs in other fields of study. ISAs are not for everyone. We encourage all applicants to weigh the features and benefits of ISAs against other financing options available to them. UC San Diego Extension outlines several other options here

What are the payment requirements?  

Once you leave the program, you’ll be responsible for paying back a percentage of your income, which varies depending on what program you choose. These payments will not be required until you earn $40,000 a year or more.

What percentage of income would I be required to pay back?  

Depending on your course of study, your income share will be between six and eight percent of your income. 

What is the payment cap for the ISA?  

The Workforce ISA Fund payment cap is $11,700, or 1.8x the cost of the program. This means that if you were to graduate from UC San Diego Extension and get a high-paying job, you may make fewer payments than the number in your ISA contract.

How do monthly payments work?  

Monthly payments are calculated by multiplying your earned monthly income and your required income share. You will receive a monthly bill for this amount and you can make your payments online through our servicing platform. 

Following the completion of the program, when does the payment plan start?  

After leaving the program, there is a three–month grace period before you’re required to begin making payments if you are earning an annual salary over $40,000.   

Can I pay off my ISA early?  

Yes. You can complete your obligation at any time by paying the payment cap.

Am I guaranteed a job at the end of the program? 

No. The Workforce Partnership can’t guarantee you a job, but we’ll do everything we can to help you get one. We have an established track record of serving thousands of San Diegans every year and a dedicated team that will help you achieve your career goals after graduation. 

What other options are available to pay for a UC San Diego Extension certificate?  

Please review these options on UC San Diego Extension’s website. 

What if I’m interested in gaining similar skills, but I do not want to sign up for an ISA?  

There are many other technology education options for people interested in these careers. The UC San Diego Extension courses chosen are available to anyone, independent of this program.

San Diego’s community colleges also offer classes in these subject areas that may be lower cost, or even free, depending on your financial situation. As part of our application process, the Workforce Partnership will help you evaluate other potential educational and financial options to make sure an ISA is the right fit. 

The Workforce Partnership partners with a financial institution that specializes in issuing & managing income share agreements. After you have graduated or exited the program, payments will be made to this partner through an online portal much like paying a utility bill. These payments will go back into our ISA Fund and enable us to continue to offer this program to more students in the coming years.

When you sign an ISA contract with the Workforce Partnership, you can expect the timeline of your contract to look something like this:

15526 Wp Isapathway Desktop B.03b

Education – You attend UC San Diego Extension and complete your chosen certificate, which takes 9–18 months. No payments are due during your time in the program even if you secure a high paying job.

Graduation – You have a 3-month grace period after your graduate or leave the program before you need to start making payments. No payments are due during the grace period even if you secure a high-paying job during your studies.

Payment period – 3 months after graduation or exiting the program, you begin to make payments IF you earn more than $40,000 a year. If not, you submit documentation to our financing partners on a quarterly basis to confirm your earnings are below this threshold.

Contract expires – At some point, your obligation to your ISA will end. This may occur when you have hit the payment cap, made the required number of payments OR the contract payment window has expired. Once you have reached one of these three milestones, your contract has expired and your obligation to pay back the fund has ended.

Income share agreements (ISAs) are a financial tool, which can feel complicated. But once you get to know some of the key terms and features associated with them you’ll see they are a useful and straightforward way to pay for education. Here are five important components of a Workforce Partnership ISA. 

Income share:  

This is the fixed percentage of your monthly income that you pay back after you’ve left the program and are earning more than $40,000 annually ($3333.33/month). 

Please remember that your ISA is tied to the monthly figure of $3333.33/month. If you were to take a contract position that paid you $30,000 over 6 months ($5,000/month), you would still be required to make payments should you be in your payment period.

Required payments:  

This is the maximum number of months that you’ll make payments for. After you’ve made the number of monthly required payments described in your ISA contract—between 36 and 60 monthly payments depending on your certificate program—your obligation is complete, no matter how much you ultimately paid. 

Income threshold & payment pause:  

You’re only obligated to make payments when you’re making more than the income threshold, which is $40,000. When you’re making less than $40,000 your payments are paused. You’ll resume payments when you are earning above the minimum income threshold. 

Payment cap:  

If you land a great job soon after you graduate, you might reach the payment cap, which is the maximum amount (in dollar terms) you can pay under your ISA obligation. If you do, your obligation to the ISA has been fulfilled.

Payment window:

If your payments pause because you’re below the income threshold, you will make up those payments once you start earning above the threshold again. This can extend the period of time over which you make your required number of payments. The payment window is the maximum length of time over which you can make payments. At the end of the payment window your obligation is over, provided your account is in good standing, regardless of how many payments you’ve made.

Income share agreements are a student loan alternative. If you’re considering a Workforce ISA as a way to pay for your education, consider some of the following differences:

Your payments for an income share agreement are tied to your success

When you sign up for a student loan, you agree to the payment you are going to make on a monthly basis. If your income increases, decreases or even if you lose your job, a student loan payment still needs to be made. ISA’s are different because your payment is based on a percentage of your salary if you are making more than $40,000 a year. If you make more money, your payment increases; if you make less, your payment decreases or pauses.

Student loans allow you to end your obligations quickly

One area that student loans and ISAs differ in is that loans vary based upon your payment schedule. Loans enable you to pay off your obligation faster and pay less. The obligation can also grow far beyond the original principle if you default on payments because you are unable to pay. ISAs are different in that you cannot reduce your payment by paying off your obligation more quickly.

Income share agreements protect those who don’t succeed   

Unlike a student loan, ISAs are designed so that you only make payments when your income allows you to. In our program, if your earnings drop below the $40,000 threshold, you do not need to continue to make payments. ISAs also have a fixed timeline that eventually expires no matter how much you’ve paid. This means students who go through our program who don’t earn over $40,000 a year never have to pay the program back.

Because income share agreements are tied to the salary students make after graduating, all of our Workforce ISA fund contracts are slightly different. The terms that we have set for each class have been calculated to ensure that each class is eventually able to break even and sustain itself. Below are sample contracts for all of the programs the ISA Fund currently offers.

Sample contracts:

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